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Skin-picking and Self-injurious Behavior

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Skin-picking as a form of self-injurious behavior

Amy Gedeon

Penn State College of Medicine

September 2002 

 

Self-Mutilation

            Intentional infliction of bodily injury to oneself, without intent to die

            Three types 

1.      Severe but infrequent – e.g. amputation; associated with psychosis

2.      Stereotypic – function as self-stimulation; e.g. head-banging

3.      Moderate – episodic and compulsive; e.g. self-cutting, skin picking, and trichotillomania

 

Clinical Characteristics of Skin Picking

 

Prevalence

 

Course of Illness

 

Association with Axis I and Axis II Psychiatric Disorders

 

Biological etiology of skin picking 

 

Implication of B-endorphins

 

Psychological Theories of Skin Picking

 

Treatment

 

Conclusion

 

References:

 

Self-injurious Behavior Home Page

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